Gynecologic Surgery

Ranked among the "Best Regional Hospitals" in the New York Metro area by U.S. News & World Report for Gynecology, Northern Westchester Hospital provides quality, patient-centered gynecologic care and expertise, close to home.

Advances in minimally invasive technologies and surgical techniques—such as robot assisted surgery—have changed the way many gynecologic problems are treated today. The da Vinci robots at Northern Westchester Hospital are tremendously sophisticated and precise surgical tools used by surgeons to enhance their skills.

Conditions Treated with Minimally Invasive and Robot-assisted Surgery

Minimally invasive and robotic gynecologic surgeries are most frequently conducted to treat:

  • Hysterectomy/ Radical Hysterectomy
  • Endometriosis / Adenomyosis
  • Endometrial cancers
  • Myomectomy (removal of uterine fibroids—non-malignant tumors in the uterus)
  • Excessive Menstrual Bleeding
  • Pelvic Lymphadenectomy
  • Ovarian Cystectomy
  • Uterine Prolapse
  • Abdominal Cerclage

Quick Links

View this short video about da Vinci Surgery for hysterectomy

See what patients say about robot-assisted hysterectomy

Find Frequently Asked Questions

 

Benefits of Minimally Invasive and Robotic Surgery

Through minimally invasive and robot-assisted surgery, patients benefit from:

  • smaller incisions and reduced scarring
  • less pain
  • a lower risk of infection,
  • decreased blood loss
  • faster recovery times

For instance, patients who have undergone the da Vinci robotic surgery hysterectomy are now going home the day of or the day after surgery and generally go back to work within one to two weeks.


Gynecologic Robotic Surgery in Westchester, NY at NWH

daVinci Hysterectomy

A wide variety of benign (non-cancerous) conditions can affect a woman’s reproductive system. Benign gynecologic conditions like fibroids (growths in and/or around the uterus), endometriosis (uterine lining growing outside the uterus) or pelvic prolapse (slipping of the uterus, vagina and/ or bladder) can cause chronic pain, heavy bleeding and other mild to severe symptoms.

Women who experience severe symptoms are often treated with hysterectomy—the surgical removal of the uterus. An estimated one third of all women in the U.S. have a hysterectomy by age 60. (8)

If your doctor recommends hysterectomy, you may be a candidate for minimally invasive da Vinci Hysterectomy. Using state-of-the-art technology, da Vinci Hysterectomy requires only a few tiny incisions so you can get back to your life faster. da Vinci enables surgeons to perform delicate and complex operations with superior vision, precision, dexterity and control.

da Vinci robotic surgery Hysterectomy offers women many potential benefits over traditional surgery, including:

  • Less pain (2)
  • Fewer complications (3)
  • Less blood loss (4,5)
  • Shorter hospital stay (5)
  • Low risk of wound infection (6)
  • Quicker recovery and return to normal activities (7)

Ask your doctor if da Vinci surgery is right for you.


Early Stage Gynecologic Cancer

A wide variety of gynecologic cancers can affect a woman’s reproductive system. The most common types of gynecologic cancers are cervical, endometrial (uterine) and ovarian cancer. Women with early stage gynecologic cancer are often treated with hysterectomy—the surgical removal of the uterus. Hysterectomy is the second most common surgical procedure for women in the United States, and an estimated one third of all U.S. women will have a hysterectomy by age 60 (1)

If you have a gynecologic cancer—such as cancer of the uterus or cervix—hysterectomy may be your best treatment option. The type of hysterectomy you have will depend upon your medical history and health, as well as the extent of the cancer growth.

If your doctor recommends hysterectomy, you may be a candidate for minimally invasive da Vinci Surgery. Using leading edge technology, a da Vinci Hysterectomy requires only a few tiny incisions and may allow you to progress to secondary treatment, if needed, more quickly.

da Vinci Surgery enables your doctor to perform a hysterectomy to treat gynecologic cancers with enhanced vision, precision, dexterity and control. da Vinci offers women many potential benefits over traditional surgery, including:

  • Less pain (2)
  • Fewer complications (3)
  • Less blood loss (4,5)
  • Shorter hospital stay (5)
  • Low risk of wound infection (6)
  • Quicker recovery & return to normal activities (7)

Ask your doctor if da Vinci surgery is right for you.


Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a condition in which the tissue that lines the uterus—the endometrium—also grows outside the uterus. This tissue, called implants or lesions, is found most often in the pelvic area, but can develop in other parts of the body. Endometriosis affects about five percent of the female population of reproductive age.(9) Family history plays an important role—a woman who has a mother or sister with endometriosis is six times more likely to develop the condition.(10)

For women suffering from severe symptoms, there are two surgical options to treat endometriosis: Resection and Hysterectomy.

  • Endometriosis resection involves removing all visible implants while leaving the uterus and other organs in place. Endometriosis resection is usually recommended for women who want to get pregnant in the future.
  • Hysterectomy involves removing the uterus and possibly other organs. It is often recommended for women who are not planning a future pregnancy.

If your doctor recommends surgery, you may be a candidate for minimally invasive da Vinci Endometriosis Resection. Using state-of-the-art technology, da Vinci Surgery requires just a few tiny incisions. The enhanced vision, precision, dexterity and control of the da Vinci System allows your surgeon to perform thorough removal of deeply penetrated or widespread endometrial implants. da Vinci surgery offers patients many potential benefits over traditional laparoscopy, including:

  • Low blood loss (11)
  • Low conversion rate to open surgery (11)
  • Low rate of complications (11)
  • Short hospital stay (11)
  • Minimal scarring

Ask your doctor if da Vinci surgery is right for you.


Uterine Fibroids and Myomectomy

A uterine fibroid is a common type of benign (non-cancerous) tumor that can grow inside and also outside the uterus. Uterine fibroids are most common in women ages 30 to 40, but can occur at any age, with up to 80% of women developing fibroids by age 50.(12,13) Uterine fibroids are the most common reason a hysterectomy is performed.(13)

Myomectomy is a common alternative to hysterectomy for treating fibroids. Myomectomy surgically removes fibroid tumors, while leaving the uterus in place. Myomectomy is often recommended and considered the standard of care for women who want to become pregnant or keep their uterus for other reasons. (13,14) A recent study found that da Vinci Myomectomy can provide a minimally invasive option even for overweight patients.(15)

If your doctor recommends surgery to treat uterine fibroids, you may be a candidate for da Vinci Myomectomy—a minimally invasive, uterine-sparing procedure. Using state-of-the-art technology, da Vinci Myomectomy requires only a few tiny incisions and enables surgeons to perform this delicate operation with superior vision, precision, dexterity and control. da Vinci Myomectomy offers many potential benefits including:

  • Less blood loss (15,16,17)
  • Shorter hospital stay (15,16,17,18)
  • Less pain medication required (18)
  • Small incisions that help minimize scarring
  • Greater likelihood your surgeon can remove heavier fibroids (16)

Ask your doctor if da Vinci Myomectomy surgery is right for you.


Pelvic Prolapse Sacrocolpopexy

Pelvic prolapse is a condition that occurs when muscles and ligaments supporting your pelvic organs weaken. As a result, these organs (uterus, vagina, cervix, bladder, urethra, or rectum) slip from their normal position. Severe uterine prolapse can cause the uterus to slip partially into the vagina. It may cause the upper part of the vagina to sag into the vaginal canal or even outside the vagina. Pelvic prolapse affects about one in every three women who have had a child and one in nine women experience symptoms severe enough to need surgery.(19)

Typically, pelvic prolapse worsens over time and can only be fully corrected with surgery through a procedure called sacrocolpopexy. It is considered the most effective way to correct pelvic prolapse and resolve symptoms.(20)

If your doctor recommends sacrocolpopexy to treat pelvic prolapse, ask about minimally invasive da Vinci Surgery. State-of-the-art da Vinci Surgery requires just a few tiny incisions. The enhanced vision, precision, dexterity and control of da Vinci allows your doctor to perform a durable sacrocolpopexy even for women with complex cases.(21)

Ask your doctor if da Vinci sacrocolpopexy surgery is right for you.


Resources

1) Available from: http://www.womenshealth.gov/publications/our-publications/fact-sheet/hysterectomy.cfm

2) Ko EM, Muto MG, Berkowitz RS, Feltmate CM.Robotic versus open radical hysterectomy:
a comparative study at a single institution. Gynecol Oncol. 2008 Dec;111(3):425-30. Epub 2008 Oct 16.

3) Piquion-Joseph JM, Navar A, Ghazaryan A, Papanna R, Klimek W, Laroia R. Robot-assisted gynecological surgery in a community setting. Journal of Robotic Surgery, 2009:1-4.

4) DeNardis SA, Holloway RW, Bigsby GE, Pikaart DP, Ahmad S, and Finkler NJ. Robotically assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy versus total abdominal hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy for endometrial cancer. Gynecologic Oncology 2008;111:412-417.

5) Payne, T. N. and F. R. Dauterive. A comparison of total laparoscopic hysterectomy to robotically assisted hysterectomy: surgical outcomes in a community practice. J Minim Invasive Gynecol, 2008;15(3): 286-291.

6) Boggess JF, Gehrig PA, Cantrell L, Shafer A, Ridgway M, Skinner EN, Fowler WC. A comparative study of 3 surgical methods for hysterectomy with staging for endometrial cancer: robotic assistance, laparoscopy, laparotomy. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Oct;199(4):360.e1-9.

7) Bell MC, Torgerson J, Seshadri-Kreaden U, Suttle AW, Hunt S. Comparison of outcomes and cost for endometrial cancer staging via traditional laparotomy, standard laparoscopy and robotic techniques. Gynecol Oncol. 2008 Dec;111(3):407-11. Epub 2008 Oct 1.

8) Medline Plus; A Service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine – National Institutes of Health. “Hysterectomy.” Available from: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/hysterectomy.html.

9) Available from: www.bioscience.org  

10) National Institutes of Health. Available from: www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000915.htm

11) Nezhat C, Lewis M, Kotikela S, Veeraswamy A, Saadat L, Hajhosseini B, Nezhat C. Robotic versus standard laparoscopy for the treatment of endometriosis. Fertil Steril. 2010 Dec;94(7):2758-60. Epub 2010 May 26.

12) Uterine Fibroids; American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Available from: http://www.acog.org/Resources_And_Publications

13) Uterine Fibroids; WomensHealth.gov U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Available from: http://www.womenshealth.gov/faq/uterine-fibroids.cfm#5

14) Advincula AP, Song A, Burke W, Reynolds RK. Preliminary experience with robot-assisted laparoscopic myomectomy. J Am Assoc Gynecol Laparosc. 2004 Nov;11(4):511-8.

15) Sangha R, et al. Surgical outcomes for robotic assisted laparoscopic myomectomy compared to abdominal myomectomy. Journal of Robotic Surgery, Volume 4, Number 4, December 2010 , pp. 229-233(5).

16) Barakat EE, et al. Robotic-assisted, laparoscopic, and abdominal myomectomy: a comparison of surgical outcomes. Obstet Gynecol. 2011 Feb;117(2 Pt 1):256-65.

17) Ascher-Walsh CJ, et al. Robot-assisted laparoscopic myomectomy is an improvement over laparotomy in women with a limited number of myomas. J Minim Invasive Gynecol. 2010 May-Jun;17(3):306-10. Epub 2010 Mar 19.

18) Nash K, et al. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic myomectomy versus abdominal myomectomy: a comparative analysis of surgical outcomes and costs. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2012 Feb; 285(2):435-40. Epub 2011 Jul 22.

19) Available from: http://www.iuga.org/?patientinfo

20) Nygaard IE, McCreery R, Brubaker L, Connolly A, Cundiff G, Weber AM, Zyczynski H; Pelvic Floor Disorders Network. Abdominal sacrocolpopexy: a comprehensive review. Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Oct;104(4):805-23.

21) Elliott DS, Krambeck AE, Chow GK. Long-term results of robotic assisted laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy for the treatment of high grade vaginal vault prolapse. J Urol. 2006 Aug;176(2):655-9.